Analytical Chemistry. Plenary Lectures Presented at the by A. Hulanicki

By A. Hulanicki

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These automatic instruments produce continuous analysis, with the output in a machine-readable format or in a form suitable for telemetry to a central data-acquisition facility. 530 MODERN METHODS FOR AIR POLLUTION MONITORING MEASUREMENT APPROACHES FOR STATIONARY SOURCES The approach of the various instruments described to monitor a pollutant either by laboratory analysis or by analysers is the same. These instruments can be called 'point' sensors as they measure the concentration of the given pollutant at a single point.

One way out of the difficulty is to immerse the limbs in lucite tanks filled with water and to surround the skull with lucite. Even so, the variation in induced radioactivity per gram of bone may be as much as 25 per cent between the spine and the ankle. —44-3C J. M. A. LENIHAN counter. By this technique, it is certainly possible to produce, in a gamma-ray spectrometer, a visible peak corresponding to 49 Ca. To translate this peak into the total mass of calcium in the body is, however, much more difficult, since there is at present no combination of equipment in the world fulfilling the two essential conditions for accuracy—uniform thermal neutron flux throughout the body and uniform sensitivity of detection, regardless of position in the body.

The properties of the isotope, such as its half-life and the nature and energy of the radiations that it emits, are usually sufficiently specific to allow the confident identification of one or more elements in the irradiated sample. A quantitative estimation is usually made by comparison of the irradiated sample with a simultaneously irradiated standard containing a small amount of the element under investigation. Often the radioactivity of a particular element can be identified even in the presence of many other induced acti­ vities.

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Analytical Chemistry. Plenary Lectures Presented at the by A. Hulanicki
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